swordsmanship Archive

  • <p>I’m going to make a prediction about the future of HEMA in Australia. I’m willing to put money on it.</p>
<p>Within three years, we will see a national umbrella organisation founded specifically for the purpose of running a high-level national HEMA competition. It exists solely to run the tournament and dictates the rules, weapons, protection and other entry requirements competitors must meet. The organisation will not train competitors itself but allow entry to any competitor suitably qualified under its strictures. However, it may accredit other schools and groups as providing a training program appropriate for the national competition. The organisation  […]</p>

    The Future of Aussie HEMA

    I’m going to make a prediction about the future of HEMA in Australia. I’m willing to put money on it.

    Within three years, we will see a national umbrella organisation founded specifically for the purpose of running a high-level national HEMA competition. It exists solely to run the tournament and dictates the rules, weapons, protection and other entry requirements competitors must meet. The organisation will not train competitors itself but allow entry to any competitor suitably qualified under its strictures. However, it may accredit other schools and groups as providing a training program appropriate for the national competition. The organisation […]

  • <p><div id="attachment_1955" style="width: 194px" class="wp-caption alignright"><p class="wp-caption-text"><em>Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur</em></p></div>Here’s an interesting little piece titled “The Strange Story of the Solicitous Phantom Cavalier who Fought a Duel on 27 January 1615 near Paris“<sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_2193_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_2193_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_2193_1">Original title : <em>Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur,</em> <em>qui s’est battu en duel le 27 janvier 1615, près Paris</em></span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_2193_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_2193_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); (PDF). It fits firmly in attempts in Europe to ban duelling which, despite the heavy-hitters, both organisations and individual, engaged in the struggle failed to achieve this end until  […]</p>

    A Duel with a Phantom Cavalier (1615)

    Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur

    Here’s an interesting little piece titled “The Strange Story of the Solicitous Phantom Cavalier who Fought a Duel on 27 January 1615 near Paris“[1]Original title : Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur, qui s’est battu en duel le 27 janvier 1615, près Paris jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_2071_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_2071_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); (PDF). It fits firmly in attempts in Europe to ban duelling which, despite the heavy-hitters, both organisations and individual, engaged in the struggle failed to achieve this end until […]

  • <p>You are standing in <i>quarte</i> or fourth, the guard for defense and waiting. You opponent changes posture into one of the offensive stances: first, second or third. What do you do? How does Cavalcabo say you defeat these aggressive guards?</p>
<blockquote><p>You will put yourself in quarte guard making a turn to the right side of the enemy, and holding your dagger on the left side, neither too high, nor too low, you uncover the right side, so that the enemy has the opportunity to strike first.</p></blockquote>
<p>We’ve seen this before. Stand with your weapons on one side so that you  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Easy as First, Second, Third

    You are standing in quarte or fourth, the guard for defense and waiting. You opponent changes posture into one of the offensive stances: first, second or third. What do you do? How does Cavalcabo say you defeat these aggressive guards?

    You will put yourself in quarte guard making a turn to the right side of the enemy, and holding your dagger on the left side, neither too high, nor too low, you uncover the right side, so that the enemy has the opportunity to strike first.

    We’ve seen this before. Stand with your weapons on one side so that you […]

  • <p>This technique appears in various formulations so frequently in the text <sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_5901_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_5901_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_5901_1">the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club</span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_5901_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_5901_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); that it must be at the core of Cavalcabo’s teaching. In its most concise form, it is written like this:</p>
<blockquote><p><i><b>To understand how one must attack for the best</b></i></p>
<p>When </p></blockquote> […]

    Cavalcabo: Passing? Traverse? Triangle Step?

    This technique appears in various formulations so frequently in the text [1]the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_9431_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_9431_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); that it must be at the core of Cavalcabo’s teaching. In its most concise form, it is written like this:

    To understand how one must attack for the best

    When

    […]
  • <p>Cavalcabo<sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_6632_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_6632_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_6632_1">the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club</span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_6632_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_6632_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); delays dealing with cutting strikes until after his advice on how to use the cloak as an off-hand device. Is this a measure of the importance he places on them?</p>
<p>The sections on strikes are about 500 words wedged between  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Plays of the Estramaçon

    Cavalcabo[1]the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_5158_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_5158_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); delays dealing with cutting strikes until after his advice on how to use the cloak as an off-hand device. Is this a measure of the importance he places on them?

    The sections on strikes are about 500 words wedged between […]

  • <p>So, I’m trawling through Cavalcabo’s fencing text <sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_3974_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_3974_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_3974_1">the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club</span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_3974_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_3974_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); for nuggets of tactical advice. You know the sort of thing I mean, “always maintain the initiative,” “don’t  feint because smart fencers won’t fall for it and stupid ones won’t respond the way you  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Tactical Advice

    So, I’m trawling through Cavalcabo’s fencing text [1]the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_6568_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_6568_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); for nuggets of tactical advice. You know the sort of thing I mean, “always maintain the initiative,” “don’t  feint because smart fencers won’t fall for it and stupid ones won’t respond the way you […]

  • <p>There’s a lot of talk about at the moment about whether what we do is a martial art, martial sport, historical reconstruction or something else. To my mind, all of these missing the point and fail to address the most basic question – why use swords at all? There are three answers that I can see. </p>
<p>Modern schools of historical swordsmanship grew out of the thirty year old movement to reconstruct lost aspects of the western martial heritage and this remains the foundation of the practice. There’s still a huge amount of debate about what various masters meant by what  […]</p>

    Why swords?

    There’s a lot of talk about at the moment about whether what we do is a martial art, martial sport, historical reconstruction or something else. To my mind, all of these missing the point and fail to address the most basic question – why use swords at all? There are three answers that I can see.

    Modern schools of historical swordsmanship grew out of the thirty year old movement to reconstruct lost aspects of the western martial heritage and this remains the foundation of the practice. There’s still a huge amount of debate about what various masters meant by what […]

  • Swordplay 2012 is Australia's national gathering for period fencing and historical swordsmanship. The key events are Puck Curtis jetting in from the United States to teach a workshop on Spanish Destreza fencing and the Skill-At-Arms tournament. I've struggled long and hard with my conscience and finally taken the decision that I must do something dramatic to even the playing field at the tournament. So, here is the secret teachings of the Australian College of Arms. Use this knowledge wisely in your preparations for the event.

    Fencing Advice for Swordplay 2012

    Swordplay 2012 is Australia's national gathering for period fencing and historical swordsmanship. The key events are Puck Curtis jetting in from the United States to teach a workshop on Spanish Destreza fencing and the Skill-At-Arms tournament. I've struggled long and hard with my conscience and finally taken the decision that I must do something dramatic to even the playing field at the tournament. So, here is the secret teachings of the Australian College of Arms. Use this knowledge wisely in your preparations for the event.