fencing Archive

  • <p>I’m going to make a prediction about the future of HEMA in Australia. I’m willing to put money on it.</p>
<p>Within three years, we will see a national umbrella organisation founded specifically for the purpose of running a high-level national HEMA competition. It exists solely to run the tournament and dictates the rules, weapons, protection and other entry requirements competitors must meet. The organisation will not train competitors itself but allow entry to any competitor suitably qualified under its strictures. However, it may accredit other schools and groups as providing a training program appropriate for the national competition. The organisation  […]</p>

    The Future of Aussie HEMA

    I’m going to make a prediction about the future of HEMA in Australia. I’m willing to put money on it.

    Within three years, we will see a national umbrella organisation founded specifically for the purpose of running a high-level national HEMA competition. It exists solely to run the tournament and dictates the rules, weapons, protection and other entry requirements competitors must meet. The organisation will not train competitors itself but allow entry to any competitor suitably qualified under its strictures. However, it may accredit other schools and groups as providing a training program appropriate for the national competition. The organisation […]

  • André des Bordes (1582? - 1625) should be recognised by posterity as the fencing master to two dukes of Lorraine, Charles III and Henri II. However, he has gone down in history as the victim of dynastic in-fighting in the province and remains the only fencing teacher known to have been executed as a witch.

    The Rise and Fall of André des Bordes

    André des Bordes (1582? - 1625) should be recognised by posterity as the fencing master to two dukes of Lorraine, Charles III and Henri II. However, he has gone down in history as the victim of dynastic in-fighting in the province and remains the only fencing teacher known to have been executed as a witch.
  • <p><em>La Canne Royale</em>, my translation into English of two French cane training manuals, has hit the virtual bookshelves and is available for purchase. If you are interested in the history of stick fighting or the early development of modern physical education, this is the book for you.</p>
<p>Check out the book’s page on the LongEdge Press website to find which online bookstores are carrying <em>La Canne Royale.</em></p>
<p>Here’s the blurb from the back of the book to whet your appetite.</p>
<hr />
<div id="attachment_1958" style="width: 209px" class="wp-caption alignright"><p class="wp-caption-text">La Canne Royale : Chris Slee : LongEdge Press</p></div>
<blockquote><p>La Canne holds a unique position in the development of </p></blockquote> […]

    La Canne Royale: Where do I buy it?

    La Canne Royale, my translation into English of two French cane training manuals, has hit the virtual bookshelves and is available for purchase. If you are interested in the history of stick fighting or the early development of modern physical education, this is the book for you.

    Check out the book’s page on the LongEdge Press website to find which online bookstores are carrying La Canne Royale.

    Here’s the blurb from the back of the book to whet your appetite.


    La Canne Royale : Chris Slee : LongEdge Press

    La Canne holds a unique position in the development of

    […]
  • <p><div id="attachment_1955" style="width: 194px" class="wp-caption alignright"><p class="wp-caption-text"><em>Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur</em></p></div>Here’s an interesting little piece titled “The Strange Story of the Solicitous Phantom Cavalier who Fought a Duel on 27 January 1615 near Paris“<sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_3568_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_3568_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_3568_1">Original title : <em>Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur,</em> <em>qui s’est battu en duel le 27 janvier 1615, près Paris</em></span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_3568_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_3568_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); (PDF). It fits firmly in attempts in Europe to ban duelling which, despite the heavy-hitters, both organisations and individual, engaged in the struggle failed to achieve this end until  […]</p>

    A Duel with a Phantom Cavalier (1615)

    Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur

    Here’s an interesting little piece titled “The Strange Story of the Solicitous Phantom Cavalier who Fought a Duel on 27 January 1615 near Paris“[1]Original title : Histoire prodigieuse du fantôme cavalier solliciteur, qui s’est battu en duel le 27 janvier 1615, près Paris jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_1403_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_1403_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); (PDF). It fits firmly in attempts in Europe to ban duelling which, despite the heavy-hitters, both organisations and individual, engaged in the struggle failed to achieve this end until […]

  • <p>You are standing in <i>quarte</i> or fourth, the guard for defense and waiting. You opponent changes posture into one of the offensive stances: first, second or third. What do you do? How does Cavalcabo say you defeat these aggressive guards?</p>
<blockquote><p>You will put yourself in quarte guard making a turn to the right side of the enemy, and holding your dagger on the left side, neither too high, nor too low, you uncover the right side, so that the enemy has the opportunity to strike first.</p></blockquote>
<p>We’ve seen this before. Stand with your weapons on one side so that you  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Easy as First, Second, Third

    You are standing in quarte or fourth, the guard for defense and waiting. You opponent changes posture into one of the offensive stances: first, second or third. What do you do? How does Cavalcabo say you defeat these aggressive guards?

    You will put yourself in quarte guard making a turn to the right side of the enemy, and holding your dagger on the left side, neither too high, nor too low, you uncover the right side, so that the enemy has the opportunity to strike first.

    We’ve seen this before. Stand with your weapons on one side so that you […]

  • <p>This technique appears in various formulations so frequently in the text <sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_4661_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_4661_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_4661_1">the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club</span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_4661_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_4661_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); that it must be at the core of Cavalcabo’s teaching. In its most concise form, it is written like this:</p>
<blockquote><p><i><b>To understand how one must attack for the best</b></i></p>
<p>When </p></blockquote> […]

    Cavalcabo: Passing? Traverse? Triangle Step?

    This technique appears in various formulations so frequently in the text [1]the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_5319_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_5319_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); that it must be at the core of Cavalcabo’s teaching. In its most concise form, it is written like this:

    To understand how one must attack for the best

    When

    […]
  • <p>Cavalcabo<sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_9215_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_9215_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_9215_1">the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club</span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_9215_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_9215_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); delays dealing with cutting strikes until after his advice on how to use the cloak as an off-hand device. Is this a measure of the importance he places on them?</p>
<p>The sections on strikes are about 500 words wedged between  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Plays of the Estramaçon

    Cavalcabo[1]the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_7782_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_7782_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); delays dealing with cutting strikes until after his advice on how to use the cloak as an off-hand device. Is this a measure of the importance he places on them?

    The sections on strikes are about 500 words wedged between […]

  • <p>So, I’m trawling through Cavalcabo’s fencing text <sup id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_7050_1" class="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text" onclick="footnote_moveToAnchor('footnote_plugin_reference_7050_1');">[1]</sup><span class="footnote_tooltip" id="footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_7050_1">the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club</span>	jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_7050_1").tooltip({		tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_7050_1",		tipClass: "footnote_tooltip",		effect: "fade",		fadeOutSpeed: 100,		predelay: 400,		position: "top right",		relative: true,		offset: [10, 10]	}); for nuggets of tactical advice. You know the sort of thing I mean, “always maintain the initiative,” “don’t  feint because smart fencers won’t fall for it and stupid ones won’t respond the way you  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Tactical Advice

    So, I’m trawling through Cavalcabo’s fencing text [1]the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier, available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club jQuery("#footnote_plugin_tooltip_9964_1").tooltip({ tip: "#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_9964_1", tipClass: "footnote_tooltip", effect: "fade", fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: "top right", relative: true, offset: [10, 10] }); for nuggets of tactical advice. You know the sort of thing I mean, “always maintain the initiative,” “don’t  feint because smart fencers won’t fall for it and stupid ones won’t respond the way you […]

  • <p>I’m trying to figure out the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier. This text is available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club.</p>
<p>The text is fairly straightforward but there are occasional sections which seem very dense and need some unpacking to understand what is being said. Here’s the second example I came across and what I did with it.</p>
<blockquote><p>“<strong>Against those who use feints</strong><br />
So you understand which things are counters to those who use </p></blockquote> […]

    Cavalcabo: Techniques Against Feints

    I’m trying to figure out the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier. This text is available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club.

    The text is fairly straightforward but there are occasional sections which seem very dense and need some unpacking to understand what is being said. Here’s the second example I came across and what I did with it.

    Against those who use feints
    So you understand which things are counters to those who use

    […]
  • <p>I’m back and I’m exploring the development of the French school between Henry de Sainct-Didier (1573), the first native fencing manual, and Charles Besnard (1653), the cementing of the French school in fencing with the foil.</p>
<p>To start, I’m trying to figure out the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s <span style="text-decoration: underline;">Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons</span> (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier. This text is available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club.</p>
<p>The text is fairly straightforward but there are occasional sections which seem very dense and need some unpacking  […]</p>

    Cavalcabo: Unpacking His Example Actions

    I’m back and I’m exploring the development of the French school between Henry de Sainct-Didier (1573), the first native fencing manual, and Charles Besnard (1653), the cementing of the French school in fencing with the foil.

    To start, I’m trying to figure out the very influential translation by Villamont from Italian to French of Cavalcabo’s Treatise or Instruction on Fighting with Weapons (1597) and a similar essay by Patenostrier. This text is available in English translation by Rob Runacres of the Renaissance Sword Club.

    The text is fairly straightforward but there are occasional sections which seem very dense and need some unpacking […]

  • <p><strong>Title</strong>: Fencing through the Ages<br />
<strong>Author</strong>: Adolphe Corthey<br />
<strong>Translator</strong>: Chris Slee<br />
<strong>Publisher</strong>: LongEdge Press<br />
<strong>Pub. Date</strong>: 2015<br />
<strong>Language</strong>: English (original in French)<br />
<strong>Pages</strong>: 76<br />
<strong>Format(s)</strong>: US Digest, EPUB, MOBI<br />
<strong>ISBN</strong>: (Paperback) 9780994359001, (eBook) 9780994359018</p>
Selling Paperback and eBook
<ul>
<li>Lulu Bookstore [paperback link, ebook link]</li>
<li>Amazon</li>
<li>Barnes and Noble</li>
<li>AbeBooks</li>
</ul>
Selling Paperback Only
<ul>
<li>Angus and Robertson</li>
<li>Fishpond Bookstore</li>
</ul>
Selling eBook Only
<ul>
<li>Kobo Bookstore</li>
</ul>
The Back of the Book
<p>Adolphe Corthey is the powerhouse behind the revival of interest in historical or period fencing in late nineteenth century France yet he remains largely  […]</p>

    Fencing through the Ages: Where do I buy it?

    Title: Fencing through the Ages
    Author: Adolphe Corthey
    Translator: Chris Slee
    Publisher: LongEdge Press
    Pub. Date: 2015
    Language: English (original in French)
    Pages: 76
    Format(s): US Digest, EPUB, MOBI
    ISBN: (Paperback) 9780994359001, (eBook) 9780994359018

    Selling Paperback and eBook
    • Lulu Bookstore [paperback link, ebook link]
    • Amazon
    • Barnes and Noble
    • AbeBooks
    Selling Paperback Only
    • Angus and Robertson
    • Fishpond Bookstore
    Selling eBook Only
    • Kobo Bookstore
    The Back of the Book

    Adolphe Corthey is the powerhouse behind the revival of interest in historical or period fencing in late nineteenth century France yet he remains largely […]

  • <p>The most difficult aspect of interpreting Henry de Sainct-Didier’s Secrets of the Sword Alone (1573) is not so much finding a translation for his rather vague and nebulous term <em>desrober</em> but understanding how he applies it to his system of swordsmanship. His meaning is made clear not by understanding the word itself but through simple contextual analysis of the strikes before and after the action he calls <em>desrober</em>. I will show here that Sainct-Didier has a clear and consistent meaning for the term which serves to underscore the basic principles of his text.</p>
<p>The term itself is easily understood.  […]</p>

    Henry de Sainct-Didier’s “Desrober”

    The most difficult aspect of interpreting Henry de Sainct-Didier’s Secrets of the Sword Alone (1573) is not so much finding a translation for his rather vague and nebulous term desrober but understanding how he applies it to his system of swordsmanship. His meaning is made clear not by understanding the word itself but through simple contextual analysis of the strikes before and after the action he calls desrober. I will show here that Sainct-Didier has a clear and consistent meaning for the term which serves to underscore the basic principles of his text.

    The term itself is easily understood. […]

  • <p>This is a translation of the section concerning how to step correctly in Henri de Sainct Didier’s Secrets of the Single Sword (1573). More sections of the text will be translated as time allows.</p>
<ul>
<li>Secrets of the Single Sword – Jeu de Paulme</li>
</ul>
<p>The translation is based on the transcription of the copy in the Library of the city of Blois (available at Bibliotheque Virtuelles Humanistes) made in 2010 by Olivier Depuis for l’Association pour la Recherche et le Développement des Arts Martiaux Historiques Européens. All amendments to the text made in the transcription have been assumed and are not  […]</p>

    Sainct Didier’s Comparison of Fencing and Tennis

    This is a translation of the section concerning how to step correctly in Henri de Sainct Didier’s Secrets of the Single Sword (1573). More sections of the text will be translated as time allows.

    • Secrets of the Single Sword – Jeu de Paulme

    The translation is based on the transcription of the copy in the Library of the city of Blois (available at Bibliotheque Virtuelles Humanistes) made in 2010 by Olivier Depuis for l’Association pour la Recherche et le Développement des Arts Martiaux Historiques Européens. All amendments to the text made in the transcription have been assumed and are not […]

  • <p>This is a translation of the section concerning how to step correctly in Henri de Sainct Didier’s Secrets of the Single Sword (1573). More sections of the text will be translated as time allows.</p>
<ul>
<li>Secrets of the Single Sword – Disarms and Subtleies</li>
</ul>
<p>The translation is based on the transcription of the copy in the Library of the city of Blois (available at Bibliotheque Virtuelles Humanistes) made in 2010 by Olivier Depuis for l’Association pour la Recherche et le Développement des Arts Martiaux Historiques Européens. All amendments to the text made in the transcription have been assumed and are not  […]</p>

    Sainct Didier’s Disarms and Subtleties

    This is a translation of the section concerning how to step correctly in Henri de Sainct Didier’s Secrets of the Single Sword (1573). More sections of the text will be translated as time allows.

    • Secrets of the Single Sword – Disarms and Subtleies

    The translation is based on the transcription of the copy in the Library of the city of Blois (available at Bibliotheque Virtuelles Humanistes) made in 2010 by Olivier Depuis for l’Association pour la Recherche et le Développement des Arts Martiaux Historiques Européens. All amendments to the text made in the transcription have been assumed and are not […]

  • <p>This is a translation of the section concerning how to step correctly in Henri de Sainct Didier’s Secrets of the Single Sword (1573). More sections of the text will be translated as time allows.</p>
<ul>
<li>Secrets of the Single Sword – Triangle and Quadrangle</li>
</ul>
<p>The translation is based on the transcription of the copy in the Library of the city of Blois (available at Bibliotheque Virtuelles Humanistes) made in 2010 by Olivier Depuis for l’Association pour la Recherche et le Développement des Arts Martiaux Historiques Européens. All amendments to the text made in the transcription have been assumed and are not  […]</p>

    Sainct Didier’s Footwork

    This is a translation of the section concerning how to step correctly in Henri de Sainct Didier’s Secrets of the Single Sword (1573). More sections of the text will be translated as time allows.

    • Secrets of the Single Sword – Triangle and Quadrangle

    The translation is based on the transcription of the copy in the Library of the city of Blois (available at Bibliotheque Virtuelles Humanistes) made in 2010 by Olivier Depuis for l’Association pour la Recherche et le Développement des Arts Martiaux Historiques Européens. All amendments to the text made in the transcription have been assumed and are not […]