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camillo_agrippa Archive

  • Agrippa's Treatise on the Science of Arms (1553) doesn't quite make the cut for Club 1570 (my personal interest in later sixteenth century sidesword) but he remains an important factor in the understanding of the world and mindset of fencers of the period. An civil engineer by trade, Agrippa broke with the so-called medieval traditions of fencing still extant in his life. He de-constructed the art of the sword and rebuilt it as a science on firm geometric principles. Some believe that his work may be the inspiration for the geometry of the Spanish sword art known as La Verdadera Destreza. I need to revisit Agrippa's work at some point. I've learned a lot since I wrote these posts and I can see there's plenty more to learn within the text.

    Camillo Agrippa – Redux

    Agrippa's Treatise on the Science of Arms (1553) doesn't quite make the cut for Club 1570 (my personal interest in later sixteenth century sidesword) but he remains an important factor in the understanding of the world and mindset of fencers of the period. An civil engineer by trade, Agrippa broke with the so-called medieval traditions of fencing still extant in his life. He de-constructed the art of the sword and rebuilt it as a science on firm geometric principles. Some believe that his work may be the inspiration for the geometry of the Spanish sword art known as La Verdadera Destreza. I need to revisit Agrippa's work at some point. I've learned a lot since I wrote these posts and I can see there's plenty more to learn within the text.
  • <p>This the fourth part of my series looking at the rapier teaching Camillo Agrippa outlined in his 1553 text Trattato Di Scientia d’ Arme. In this port, I want to look at the last of the primary guard, Stance A. I’m not entirely sure that this is a guard position that one would adopt in preparation for a duel but rather a position one falls into during the fight in order to make an attack.</p>
<p>Again, I’d like to acknowledge that I’m a beginner and make no claim to the accuracy or utility of what follows. I’d love anyone who  […]</p>

    Camillo Agrippa, Part the Fourth

    This the fourth part of my series looking at the rapier teaching Camillo Agrippa outlined in his 1553 text Trattato Di Scientia d’ Arme. In this port, I want to look at the last of the primary guard, Stance A. I’m not entirely sure that this is a guard position that one would adopt in preparation for a duel but rather a position one falls into during the fight in order to make an attack.

    Again, I’d like to acknowledge that I’m a beginner and make no claim to the accuracy or utility of what follows. I’d love anyone who […]

  • <p>In this third part of my wallowing in the cesspool of Agrippa’s 1553 fencing text Trattato Di Scientia d’ Arme, I want to examine the primary guards of Stance B and Stance D and try to understand the differences Agrippa makes between them. To me they seem like mirror images of each other in terms of function and Agrippa, too, treats them in this way.</p>
<p>Again, I’d like to acknowledge that I’m a beginner and make no claim to the accuracy or utility of what follows. I’d love anyone who understands Agrippa to correct me.</p>
<p>First, let’s define some terms.  […]</p>

    Camillo Agrippa, Part the Third

    In this third part of my wallowing in the cesspool of Agrippa’s 1553 fencing text Trattato Di Scientia d’ Arme, I want to examine the primary guards of Stance B and Stance D and try to understand the differences Agrippa makes between them. To me they seem like mirror images of each other in terms of function and Agrippa, too, treats them in this way.

    Again, I’d like to acknowledge that I’m a beginner and make no claim to the accuracy or utility of what follows. I’d love anyone who understands Agrippa to correct me.

    First, let’s define some terms. […]

  • <p>This is the second part of my delvings into the morass which is Camillo Agrippa‘s 1553 fencing text, Trattato Di Scientia d’ Arme. Today, I want to look at Agrippa’s third primary stance which Capo Ferro calls the only true guard position. I’m going to check out how to stand in it and what attacks and defenses can be best used from it.</p>
<p>Before getting stuck in, I’ve got to acknowledge again that I’m a beginner and make no claim to the accuracy or utility of what follows. I’d love anyone who understands Agrippa to correct me.</p>
<p>First, let’s define  […]</p>

    Camillo Agrippa, Part the Second

    This is the second part of my delvings into the morass which is Camillo Agrippa‘s 1553 fencing text, Trattato Di Scientia d’ Arme. Today, I want to look at Agrippa’s third primary stance which Capo Ferro calls the only true guard position. I’m going to check out how to stand in it and what attacks and defenses can be best used from it.

    Before getting stuck in, I’ve got to acknowledge again that I’m a beginner and make no claim to the accuracy or utility of what follows. I’d love anyone who understands Agrippa to correct me.

    First, let’s define […]

  • <blockquote>
<dl>
<dt>Inigo Montoya</dt>
<dd>You are using Bonetti’s Defense against me, ah?</dd>
<dt>Man in Black</dt>
<dd>I thought it fitting considering the rocky terrain.</dd>
<dt>Inigo Montoya</dt>
<dd>Naturally, you must suspect me to attack with Capo Ferro?</dd>
<dt>Man in Black</dt>
<dd>Naturally… but I find that Thibault cancels out Capo Ferro. Don’t you?</dd>
<dt>Inigo Montoya</dt>
<dd>Unless the enemy has studied his Agrippa… which I have.</dd>
</dl>
</blockquote>
<p>And with this quote from The Princess Bride begins my look at the work of Camillo Agrippa, a Renaissance architect, engineer and mathematician who lifted fencing out of the Middle Ages and started it on the path to becoming the  […]</p>

    Camillo Agrippa, Part The First

    Inigo Montoya
    You are using Bonetti’s Defense against me, ah?
    Man in Black
    I thought it fitting considering the rocky terrain.
    Inigo Montoya
    Naturally, you must suspect me to attack with Capo Ferro?
    Man in Black
    Naturally… but I find that Thibault cancels out Capo Ferro. Don’t you?
    Inigo Montoya
    Unless the enemy has studied his Agrippa… which I have.

    And with this quote from The Princess Bride begins my look at the work of Camillo Agrippa, a Renaissance architect, engineer and mathematician who lifted fencing out of the Middle Ages and started it on the path to becoming the […]