define('DISABLE_WP_CRON', 'true'); Tag Archives: bolognese tradition

bolognese tradition Archive

  • <p>I’m about to embark on a review of Giovanni Dall’Agocchie’s 1572 fencing treatise “Dell’Arte Di Scrimia” (The Art of Fencing) and it terrifies me. Not because the text is difficult or unapproachable but because there’s already been so much research and practice of the Bolognese tradition that I doubt whether I can add anything to that body of work. My approach, however, may be a little different.</p>
<p>I’m not so much concerned with re-creating the style as it was but understanding how I can use what Dall’Agocchie can teach in my own practice. How, for instance, does he propose I  […]</p>

    Next: Giovanni Dall’Agocchie

    I’m about to embark on a review of Giovanni Dall’Agocchie’s 1572 fencing treatise “Dell’Arte Di Scrimia” (The Art of Fencing) and it terrifies me. Not because the text is difficult or unapproachable but because there’s already been so much research and practice of the Bolognese tradition that I doubt whether I can add anything to that body of work. My approach, however, may be a little different.

    I’m not so much concerned with re-creating the style as it was but understanding how I can use what Dall’Agocchie can teach in my own practice. How, for instance, does he propose I […]

  • Last time, I looked briefly at what Giovanni Dall'Agocchie has to say in his On the Art of Fencing (1572) about teaching a complete newcomer in thirty days how to survive a duel. The simple technique he describes covers enough situations to be effective for a beginner. However, he says, if given more time, he'd teach the student a second guard. This post looks at his advice for that guard, coda lunga stretta. Together with this guard position, the porta di ferro discussed last time and Dall'Agocchie's advice on how to use them forms a solid core for any one interested in cut-and-thrust historical swordplay. A right-handed fencer is assumed.

    Learn to Duel in 30 Days – Part Two

    Last time, I looked briefly at what Giovanni Dall'Agocchie has to say in his On the Art of Fencing (1572) about teaching a complete newcomer in thirty days how to survive a duel. The simple technique he describes covers enough situations to be effective for a beginner. However, he says, if given more time, he'd teach the student a second guard. This post looks at his advice for that guard, coda lunga stretta. Together with this guard position, the porta di ferro discussed last time and Dall'Agocchie's advice on how to use them forms a solid core for any one interested in cut-and-thrust historical swordplay. A right-handed fencer is assumed.
  • I'm making a side trip into the rapier fencing technique of Giovanni Dall'Agocchie as outlined in his On the Art of Fencing (1572). He's considered the last writer within the Dardi School of rapier fencing. The book has a fascinating little section on how to teach a complete novice within thirty days enough skill and technique to allow him or her to survive a duel. His advice is extremely useful to anyone interested in cut-and-thrust swordplay.

    Learn to Duel in 30 Days – Part One

    I'm making a side trip into the rapier fencing technique of Giovanni Dall'Agocchie as outlined in his On the Art of Fencing (1572). He's considered the last writer within the Dardi School of rapier fencing. The book has a fascinating little section on how to teach a complete novice within thirty days enough skill and technique to allow him or her to survive a duel. His advice is extremely useful to anyone interested in cut-and-thrust swordplay.