C’est Bon and the Glasshouse Mountains

Last Sunday was the twelfth anniversary of the day we were married. Yay us! After all we’ve been through it was a bit of a shock to realise that we’re still together and that we actually like hanging out with each other. To celebrate, we did two things: dinner at a new (for us) french restaurant called C’est Bon on Saturday night, traipsing around the Glasshouse Mountains looking at rocks and stuff Sunday. Both our Satruday night and our Sunday wanderings were brilliant.

C’est Bon has earned itself a good rep both generally and within the french ex-pat community in Brisbane. The restaurant is rather expensive ($150+ for two) but food is simply brilliant and well worth the price. The aspect that sold us was the entree and dessert platters. We love sampling the range of tastes offered by a restaurant in order to decide whether we’ll go back. The degustation d’entrees consisted of all the standards: pate, tomato tart, escargots, scollops (coquille St Jacques) and a mousse of goat’s cheese. I took ownership of the snails and seafood immediately and had a little of whatever else Kathi deigned to leave on the plate. For mains, she choose the Duck a l’Orange (another classic) while I opted for the cassoulet because it always reminds me of our stay at Carcassonne. Both these dishes a la version original tend to be a little too oily for Australian tastes but these successfully and very gracefully leapt this hurdle. The degustation de
desserts
included a mini creme brulee and mini creme caramel, as you  would expect, but added to these a lemon tart and a chocolate tart whose filling was so dense it generated its own gravity. During dessert, the last Brisbane Riverfire ‘dump and burn’ by the soon-to-be-retired F-111s roared by.

Glasshouse Mountains Excursion

Glasshouse Mountains Excursion

The Glasshouse Mountains north of Brisbane were given their name in 1770 by James Cook who likened these volcanic plugs to glasshouses standing above a generally flat landscape. We wandered about the various lookouts and belleviews that are noted on the maps and took a bunch of photos. One of the things that surprised us was that the local aboriginal legends about the formation of the Glasshouse Mountains were completely lacking. For me, the legend is interesting because it, like many other legends of coastal peoples in the northern half of the continent, speaks of a rapidly incroaching tide which in undates the coastline. Is this a memory of the rising sea-level at the end of the last ice age? The legend is fairly well known but there is no eveidence of it at any of the sites we visited except for cryptic notes saying things like “this mountain features heavily in local legends” or that it is “considered sacred by the traditional owners of the area.” Perhaps, we theorise, the owners of the legend have not given their permission to have the story displayed publicly. Perhaps, it’s a simple oversight by the EPA who manage the area for the state govenment. Hands up anyone with more info? I’m dead keen to know.