Eating National Animals

It’s not just Australia. Of the 195 countries recognised by the UN 29 eat their national animals. That’s a little under 15% or one in seven. Here’s the list.

  • Bahamas – Blue Marlin
  • Bangladesh – Hilsa (a type of fish)
  • Bolivia – Alpaca
  • Costa Rica – White-tailed Deer
  • Denmark – Swan
  • East Timor – Crocodile
  • Eritrea – Camel
  • Finland – Brown Bear, Whooper Swan, European Perch (they eat all three of their national animals)
  • Japan – Green Pheasant
  • Kuwait – Camel
  • Macedonia – Ohrid Trout (My personal favourite fish name “I’d like some ‘orrid trout, please”)
  • Maldives – Yellow-fin Tuna
  • Monaco – European Rabbit
  • Norway – Elk
  • Pakistan – Mahasher (a type of fish)
  • Phillipines – Carabao (a type of ox), Bangus (a type of fish)
  • Saudia Arabia – Camel
  • Singapore – Peascock Bass
  • Spain – Bull
  • Swaziland – Thomson’s Gazelle
  • Sweden – Elk

Here’s a second list where I cannot confirm that the national animal is eaten but it seems an odds-on bet or where the eating of a particular national animal has been stopped because of the threat of extinction.

  • Cambodia – Kouprey (a type of ox now hunted to near extinction)
  • Honduras – White-tailed Deer
  • Ireland – Red Deer (recently protected, I understand)
  • Israel – Israeli Gazelle
  • Jordan – Oryx
  • Nambia – Oryx
  • Poland – Wisent (a type of bison)
  • Qatar – Oryx

When it comes to eating the animal emblems of sub-national regions such as states and provinces, the list gets very, very long.